Axe celebrates turning 30

Axe is celebrating 30 years of accompanying countless guys across the world on their often tumultuous journey from boyhood to manhood.

Making a mark

Man stands between two women smiling

From its launch in France in June 1983, Axe has been a trusted tool for teenage guys as they tackle the complexities of the ‘dating game’.

Over the years it has reinvented itself to keep pace with each new generation, from the archetypal seduction hero, through the rise and fall of the lad culture to a renewed respect for women.

During this time Axe has continuously pushed the boundaries with its creative ad campaigns, innovative products and the promise of the Axe Effect: confidence and success with women.

Standing out from the crowd

Axe has done more than simply respond to change: it’s also been pushing the boundaries to stand out from the crowd.

When roll-on deodorant was the norm, Axe created body spray; when guys wanted efficacy, Axe delivered fine fragrance; and when the category promised protection, Axe promised seduction. It also had the first aluminium cans when all other deodorant cans were made of steel.

Over the last ten years, greater levels of equality between guys and girls ushered in a new dynamic, leading to the launch of Axe Anarchy – the first Axe product for him and for her.

Global fan base

Axe has now grown into the world’s leading male grooming brand with a full range of hair, deodorant, face and shower products and a presence in more than 100 countries.

In France, Axe owns its own party boat, in the UK it held its own underground raves and in Australia it created its own airline, Lynx Jet.

It was among the first youth brands to embrace mobile culture with ‘Get In There’, an app that helped guys break the ice with girls, and invented the Axe ‘Wake Up Service’ whereby Axe girls woke up guys each morning with a live video call, reminding them to use Axe each day.

Keeping one step ahead

In January 2013 Axe marked the launch of its new Apollo range with a global competition to find 22 people to blast into space.

Keith Weed, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer, Unilever says: “Axe doesn’t just reflect culture; at times we have actually led it. Our communications have become part of the cultural zeitgeist.

“We’ve created number one tracks and started dance crazes around the world, we’ve spotted celebrities before they’ve become global superstars and we’ve created content that gets sought out, shared and talked about.

“However most importantly, Axe has helped young guys over the last three decades build confidence. But it’s not the past 30 years we’re excited about ‒ it’s the next 30.”

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