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Ben & Jerry’s wins Good Egg Award

Unilever ice cream brand Ben & Jerry’s has been presented with a Good Egg Award from animal welfare organisation Compassion in World Farming.

Responsibility Recognised

young girl looks over counter at a bowl of eggs

The prize recognises the fact Ben & Jerry's has used free range eggs and products in the recipes for its delicious ice creams since 2005 – an approach which benefits more than 28,000 laying hens every year. The brand prides itself on affording the best possible living conditions to its hens, and its dairy cows get star treatment too.

Sourcing suppliers with shared values

Earlier in 2011, Compassion in World Farming also gave the Ben & Jerry's Caring Dairy programme the seal of approval with its Good Dairy Award.

Using business as a tool for positive social and environmental change is just as important to Ben & Jerry's as sourcing the finest ingredients for its formulas. That's why the brand always strives to get its ingredients from producers and suppliers who share its values.

Egg-static abut the honour

"We're egg-static to have won a Good Egg Award!" says Ilaria Ida, Ben & Jerry's European Social Mission Manager.

"It's so important for us to know that the hens laying the eggs we use in our ice cream live in the nicest possible conditions. And it's great to be acknowledged for it." The Good Egg Award recognises and rewards producers, manufacturers, food service, retailers and public bodies for working in a sustainable and responsible way.

About the Good Egg Awards

The Good Egg Awards are awarded by Compassion in World Farming to celebrate companies who are using only cage/free eggs or products, or committing to do so by 2012. Good Egg Award recognises and rewards producers, manufacturers, food service, retailers and public bodies for working in a sustainable and responsible way.

Compassion in World Farming was founded over 40 years ago in 1967 by a British farmer who became dismayed by the development of modern, intensive factory farming. Today they campaign peacefully to end all cruel factory farming practices.

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